Project Photos: Issues with the Park Streams

The conditions of the streams in the park have an impact on the overall function of the Four Mile Run Stormwater Improvement Project.  By addressing some of these issues, we enable a more effective and resilient stormwater conveyance system to move stormwater to the Monongahela River.

Map of photo locations.

Map of photo locations.

Photo 1: Culverts are often clogged with debris.

Photo 1: Culverts are often clogged with debris.

Photo 2: Panther Hollow Run is a flashy stream and deposits sediment on bridges and walkways during periods of high flow.

Photo 3: Small landslides are common in the park, especially near legacy stormwater infrastructure.

Photo 4: A friendly park user has attempted to fix an older stormwater inlet with a grill.

Photo 5: Legacy terracotta pipe infrastructure is badly damaged in many places.

Photo 6: Heavy erosion of trails carries gravel into the streams. Green infrastructure can reduce or prevent excess runoff from washing out roads and trails.

Photo 7: There are huge gravel deposits in the streams. This image shows a large pile of gravel, which originated on the park pathways, in Panther Hollow Run at the confluence with Phipps Run. Reducing runoff and erosion, plus slowing down the flow of water will reduce sediment load in the stream.

Photo 8: Heavy erosion like this fills streams with gravel. Green infrastructure can reduce or prevent excess erosion from ending up in the streams.

Photo 9: Erosion washes out trails into stream. Green infrastructure can reduce or prevent excess runoff from washing out roads and trails.

Photo 10: Bridges and culverts are sometimes too small, forcing water to find other ways around the obstruction and causing additional erosion.